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Force Majeure (2014) is a Swedish comedy-drama, about the dynamics of a married couple with two kids while vacationing. A simple story filmed in breath-taking locations of the French alps, just for the cinematography, this film is a good watch. It is available on Disney+ Hotstar. Ebba and Tomas are happily married with a young daughter Vera and a young boy Harry, they are staying for a few days at a luxury resort. Getting up early every day, they have breakfast and leave for skiing on the beautiful snow-covered slopes. One day, a controlled avalanche comes damn close to where…

A Man Called Ove (2015) is a comedy-drama from Sweden about a sexagenarian named Ove Lindahl, who lives alone in a gated-community. The film starts with him going on rounds every morning, taking upon himself to be the community rules-enforcer and then to be fired from the train company where he had worked for 43 years. Not finding any purpose in life, he decides to take his own life to join his dead wife (Sonja), fortunately he keeps failing in his attempts and see his portions of his past life in flashback during each episode. The screenplay is familiar and…

The Players (2020)  is an Italian romantic comedy film with a familiar story of husbands cheating on their wives. What’s different in the film directed by Stefano Mordini, was the straying, ranges from fetishes to serious plotting to keep their affairs hidden from their wives. All the four female leads have done their roles well, showing up a wide array of emotions from feeling puzzled, sad, betrayed & angry. Other than being a light entertainment, there was nothing gripping in the screenplay. It is available on Netflix.

Can a film be about going around a city and showing a glimpse of everyday life there without becoming a documentary? Yes, proves this Russian film: I walk around Moscow (aka Walking the Streets of Moscow).  And it does so in an engaging and humorous style. The film is made available for free by Russian Centre of Science & Culture, New Delhi on YouTube. The film starts with a budding writer from Siberia getting down in Moscow’s airport in the morning and leaving the city in the evening. During the day, he befriends a young worker at Moscow’s Metro rail. Together they go…

How to do a satire of a then prevailing repressive regime, without actually been seen as being one? To see one that’s done well, check out this comedy film “The Twelve Chairs (1971)”. It is an adaptation of Ilf and Petrov’s 1928 Russian novel The Twelve Chairs. With a running time of 2h 39 min, it was long, and you need a lot of patience to get through the film whose story was obvious from the beginning. What makes you sit through was the brilliant direction by Director Leonid Gaidai who gives you a satisfaction of watching an epic with…